El camino review。 El Camino Review: Breaking Bad Movie Breaks No New Ground

El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie movie review (2019)

el camino review

Six years later, Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan is back with the results. Finally free from torture and slavery at the hands of Tod's uncle Jack, and from Mr. Instead, he includes an illustrative anecdote in which we learn that while Jesse was locked up, Todd Jesse Plemons took him out of his cell and forced him to go on an errand: disposing of the body of Todd's cleaning lady, who had the misfortune to find Todd's hidden money. Jesse has transcended the hell Walt brought him to, and emerges from it bolstered by the fact that Walt believed in him once, long ago, and in a flattering way intended to soak Jesse for his talents and connections. Naturally, the authorities are descending on the massacre, and they have a few questions for Mr. God, imagine Plemons in a Pop. El Camino refocuses on what drives Jesse—his distance from his parents, his collegial warmth with his friends, his relentless empathy for the helpless. And yet there seems — based on its placement near the end of a gauntlet of trials that bring Jesse almost all the way to independence — a very hefty dollop of uplift intended here too. That, in effect, is why this film seems to exist. Todd was always an only-half-knowable grotesque, one of those Jim Thompson-y fellas who could be a lucky simpleton or an evil genius. Not a big deal, maybe; Paul won his third Emmy for that season. Cool little story about Jesse, but not the fireworks that is Breaking Bad. I don't think they'll make it, but I sure would. What choice do we have but to see his story through to the end? The story of men testing their mettle to survive against the grand, spacious, pitiless landscape of the frontier ends with a lot of bodies on the ground. This serves the character, one who has every reason to have aged more than six years during his time in captivity. Paul, whose performance as Jesse won him three Emmys, seems to have the ability to erase time, too. On the run in New Mexico, disoriented, and completely alone after a fight to the death between drug traffickers and white supremacists revealed in fragments throughout the film , Jesse must find a way to escape. Together, Paul and Plemons return us to that pit-of-the-stomach greatness we so fondly remember. Creator and his collaborators already spun off with the frequently wonderful origin tale. By which he knows, and they don't, he means the fact that they will never see him again. And Gilligan knew it over six years ago. Now that we know, dare we ask for a little more? And now Gilligan has written and directed El Camino, which sequel-prequels freely between past and present. Aaron Paul plays Jesse Pinkman in El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie. And the final showdown lets Gilligan indulge himself as a Western filmmaker. The scene between Paul and Forster seesaws between tension and comedy, with Jesse's certainty that Ed was faking his call to the police serving as the film's best callback to the more slapstick side of Jesse — a character who first tumbled out of an upstairs window without pants on in the series pilot. Come back after you've watched it. Taut close-ups cut out to ultra-wide shots. Producers: Mark Johnson, Melissa Bernstein, Charles Newirth, Vince Gilligan, Aaron Paul. El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie 122 minutes is available for streaming on Netflix and showing at some area theaters. My patience for sequels and prequels is nearly exhausted, but I keep making exceptions for Gilligan—who, along with Peter Gould, made prequel spinoff series Better Call Saul into an immersive character drama that stands on its own. And in the meantime, he uses his time on the phone getting them out of the house as an opportunity to tell them, in effect, not to feel bad about anything that's about to happen. It helps that Paul, as ever, is incredible in the role. But this one is good, too, and it's good for the balance of the show's story. Without Walt, he would not have wound up spending months imprisoned by a violent gang of white supremacists who locked him in a cage and beat and tortured him, killing his girlfriend while he watched in order to discipline him and threatening to kill her son if he tried to escape again. But first he needs to clean himself up, ditch the El Camino, scrape together enough cash to make a fresh start and say goodbye to the few people he loves whose lives Walt has spared. In its last season, Bad revealed that its first 50 episodes took place in one year, between birthdays. Netflix and Breaking Bad go way back. Look, I am one of the last people on the planet to underestimate the skills of Vince Gilligan, but will he have cooked up a worthy scion to Breaking Bad? The doofuses at Kandy Welding Co. We get drop-ins from characters like Joe Larry Hankin and Mike Jonathan Banks , along with Skinny and Badger and Jesse's parents. Gilligan could easily transfer his skills with composition to the big screen and this will play on a few of them in conjunction with its Netflix run. As his mind races between the present and the past, key moments reveal both the danger he's in now and the devastating events that led him to this moment. It's a suspenseful slow-burn that left me feeling like I didn't get what I was expecting. As El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie proves, Vince Gilligan was right then and he would be truly best served now to trust his gut. Intercut with scenes set in the present are the hero's reflections on the two years preceding, which inform viewers of critical incidents that led him to this time and place. Can you see this scene as a genuine moment of warmth between them? Teased out by Paul and promoted like crazy by Netflix across many platforms, El Camino will absolutely bring viewers to the streamer. Is it for series obsessives, desperate for any last trickle of information about these characters? He sinks back into the role of Jesse as if it is a second skin, thoroughly inhabiting it so he can just as thoroughly discard it. His central role became a sidelong ramification, one more piece of collateral damage in the fallrise of Walter White. The other cameos are a tad interchangeable, but there is a great lost Breaking Bad episode in El Camino, hiding like a cash pile in a fridge door. The most tense sequence in El Camino depends on the gabby old kook from down the hall ever-so-slowly watering plants with a plastic spray bottle. Wisely, El Camino also returned Jesse to the person most likely to be able to help him in his moment of panic: Ed, the vacuum cleaner repairman who has a side business taking criminals in hot water off to new lives. If anything, the visual language of his show was often underrated, and absolutely none of that is lost here. He got to trick his family into taking his money, he got to free Jesse and feel like a hero despite it being his fault Jesse was there in the first place , he got to die on his own terms, he got to kill all his enemies and he never really had to surrender the power he had assumed. Aaron Paul with five Emmy nominations and three wins for the role astonishes once again with his compelling and nuanced performance. By then, he was a traumatized, nearly feral mess. To paraphrase Lin-Manuel Miranda's , Walt may have been the first one to die, but Jesse's the one who paid for it. The result is a project that feels true to its source, a well-crafted epilogue for a beloved character who vividly understands the concept of consequences. From the very beginning of the show through its epilogue. More than arguably any other drama, decisions had repercussions and slates weren't wiped clean between episodes. He even says a few kind words about her as Jesse helps him bury her body in the desert, so certain is he that having murdered her has nothing to do with how he feels about her. This review will reveal everything, be warned. El Camino prequelizes Todd into a freaky two-hander with the imprisoned Jesse. This movie, arriving six years after the series finale, will resonate strongly with old fans; it also works as a stand-alone story, puzzling perhaps, but still satisfying. But one of the most compelling things about Breaking Bad is that it's always tried to be a very moral show, and this is in many ways a very moral movie. He's come for help, and his friends give it to him; Charles Baker and Matt Jones are very good as Jesse's dumb but basically loving friends, who feed him and get him into the shower — into which he brings his gun. The sequence in which Jesse tries to find the money in Todd's apartment, ripping things apart with increasing fury until he hears the clunk of a packet of cash he's bumped out of place, is classic Gilligan, shot and edited with a dreamlike fragmentation. Would I watch a new series about Jesse in Alaska? Jesse needs to deal with loose ends and also to find a path toward redemption. So technically, El Camino takes place just a couple years after the original series premiere. But Jesse comes through, as he always has. Paul, who rose to fame as Jesse a decade ago, shows no sign of strain in returning to a role that requires him to play someone roughly half his age. In a way, that is the story of El Camino: The Breaking Bad Movie, written and directed by Breaking Bad creator and showrunner Vince Gilligan. El Camino mainly just fills space, and likely time — something Breaking Bad never did. What El Camino does, perhaps even without meaning to, is refocus the ending of the story on the damage that Walt did. At the close of El Camino, he just looks happy to be here: A good vibe, but I prefer to feel bad. You can see how he was persuaded that Walt actually cared about him — and therefore why it's so traumatizing for Jesse that 1 Walt let Jane die, 2 Walt poisoned Brock and 3 Walt gave him to the people who physically and mentally tortured him. That can come when he makes it to Alaska. Going back to add to the series finale of a beloved show can be risky — at worst, mucking up your neat ending; at best, gilding the lily. Bad was already a stylish thriller, trending toward Luciferian chromatic extremes. If you're looking for a simple recommendation or not, here it is: El Camino is absolutely a satisfying and enjoyable addition to Breaking Bad , and Aaron Paul is very good, as always. When you see Jesse's scars, the ones on his face and back, and when you see how he was forced to test the limits of his own chains while his captors laughed at him, you realize that all of this happened only because Walt gave Jesse to people that Walt believed would kill him, and they happened not to. Jesse Aaron Paul, in the role he was born to play escapes the attack on the meth compound that was engineered by a vengeful Walter White Bryan Cranston. It's a painful and violent odyssey, and he has only the slimmest hope for a positive outcome. However, you need to remember what happened at the end of season five. The two-hour film begins where it left Jesse six years ago, and stays with him for a few agonizing days. In Walt, Gilligan illustrated how a meek facade can conceal bottomless malice. He survived, but he paid for it. It's Jesse's fault, too, to some degree, but let's be honest: Jesse Pinkman probably was never going to be anything more than a small-timer until he connected with his high school chemistry teacher, Walter White. Just as one chance at escape presents itself, that solution raises a pair of new problems to solve. Matt Jones and Charles Baker as Badger and Skinny Pete. Walter and most of the Nazis, including Todd , are dead. Jesse, who had killed Gale to protect Walt — the event that probably changed Jesse the most, prior to his captivity — was handed over to these people because Walt was mad at him. The early scenes of the film find Jesse, still brilliantly played by Aaron Paul, almost catatonic, stumbling up to Skinny Pete's and interrupting Skinny and Badger's game night. Yet, as far too many revivals, reboots and reimaginings often unfortunately reveal, if you dangle enough money and enough flattery in front of the right people, nothing really ends on television nowadays. If you continue the story of Breaking Bad past Walt's death, past the binary question of whether Jesse would live or die, you get a fuller sense of Walt's monstrous acts. It seems Gilligan got this project just in the nick of time, as both actors have aged and thickened in expected, yet anachronistic, ways. The penned and directed project is actually worse than that in many ways. El Camino is a playful project, very fun, not always necessary. Why is it important to be aware of the? White, Jesse must escape demons from his past. Given how awful things went for Jesse during the events of the final season, it seemed like the best possible ending. No need to go into a sub textual read or get caught in the minutia, but El Camino is a script that should have stayed a dream and nothing more. El Camino deepens his man-child mystique. And god, Gilligan loves this milieu: paranoid pastel catalog apartments, plain-sight master criminals sincerely dedicated to their shell-company chicken shacks and vacuum dens. Jesse—who spent the episodes leading up to the finale in a box, held prisoner by the disconcertingly cheerful Todd Jesse Plemons and his gang—has to get out of Albuquerque before law enforcement can track him down. And as much as El Camino is a movie about Jesse on the run from the police after the shootout that killed everybody else who was there including Walt , it's also a movie about Jesse's profound trauma. The big screen does justice to the same detailed sound design and nimble camera work—replete with destabilizing effects such as scenes that open from bizarre vantage points or follow heretofore unknown characters—that made for one of the most cinematic series in the history of television. A gun showdown rapid-edits between faces, firearms, and one sucker holding his cocaine straw for dear life. If I had — and I did — it's that Walt really got to run the show after everything he did. Was the ending of Breaking Bad, as it pertained to Jesse, a decent ending? The scars on his cheek suggest a grizzly bear mauling. Sadly, Forster passed away on the day of El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie's Netflix release. It's really Walt's fault, what happened to Jesse. It tells the story of what happens to Jesse following the events of Breaking Bad and what he needs to do to try and flee the town. Vince Gilligan has done a masterful job of providing a final chapter for a series noted for its remarkable characters, great acting, vibrant story, and insightful take on good and evil. The later shootout at the welding company, which even Jesse mocks as Wild West-style, does seem a little tacked on, as if it's not a Breaking Bad production without a bunch of people getting shot. And as ever, Aaron Paul as Jesse Pinkman is one of the most tragic, moving, emotional performances on television. Certainly, it's not a complete inventory of Walt's sins: There's no visit with Skyler or Marie, or with Drew Sharp's parents. That goes double for Jesse Pinkman, an audience surrogate who served as the tortured conscience of a criminal demimonde populated by milquetoast psychos Walt, Todd, Gus Fring and sad, irredeemably compromised men like Saul Goodman Bob Odenkirk and Mike Ehrmantraut Jonathan Banks. What might have felt more like a cash grab were it made in the wake of the award-winning final season feels more creatively driven six years later. A group of prostitutes appears to service a gang of villains; no nudity or on-camera sexual activity. The flat affect that Jesse Plemons has always given Todd is what makes Todd so hateful; just as Todd figured killing a young boy who showed up at the wrong moment was just sort of obvious and no big deal, he figures Jesse will understand that when his cleaning lady found his money, he obviously had no choice but to kill her. What are some of the key elements for example, characterizations, settings that writer-director Vince Gilligan retained from the series to maintain its integrity? Did Gilligan feel, deep down, like he owed the character something more? Pinkman, who has one goal: get out of New Mexico. That it's a story about trauma doesn't stop it from containing some of Gilligan's signature moves — classic Breaking Bad in the good way, not the head-shaking way. But the genre has an upside: Someone gets to ride off into the sunset. Those visits — plus, admittedly, a chance to see Evil Evil Todd, knowing the end he will meet — have a certain satisfying and familiar quality. Writer-director Vince Gilligan uses flashbacks of Jesse's imprisonment but is wisely sparing with them. Do you believe that the character is redeemable by the end of the movie? However, far from the exceptional epilogue it may aspire to be, El Camino confirms that sometimes artists like Gilligan are not the best evaluators of their own work. His symbolic shackles broken, he laughed and sobbed, his grizzled face filling the frame. Gilligan is shrewd enough, amid so much pain, to provide a dose of fan service — Walt and Jesse together again and, better yet, in happier times, via a late-in-film flashback in which Walt advises Jesse that a remarkable future lies ahead of him. Based on El Camino, I have to say no. Most importantly, that Walter rescued Jesse from the meth-dealing Nazis who had been holding him prisoner. It also helped make it a perfect show for binging on Netflix. Viewers can expect gun battles, deaths, fights, and life-or-death moments, as well as evidence of past torture, beatings, and captivity. It turns out we were fine with the idea of not knowing exactly what happened to Jesse; that way, we could always hope the best. But because it's a film so specifically about the extent of Jesse's mental and physical injuries, it places Walt's apparent concern in that context. So it is: This Jesse is shorn both of friskiness and of anything outside his tunnel-vision understanding of what he needs to do to get free. As in the television show, suspense and violence are part of the fabric of the story. As he moves from one dangerous situation to another, the tension heightens and the stakes get higher. If you're expecting the high octane drama of Breaking Bad, it's not here. Jesse could go to college or, Walt says, practically teach a college course, so expert is he in business now. One of the big questions people had about El Camino was whether you'd see Walt Bryan Cranston — presumably in a flashback, since he appeared to be dead and we now know he actually was. But to take two hours and really pay attention — not just to Jesse as an outlaw who has made some horrible choices, but also to Jesse as a victim of trauma — does a lot to flesh out the picture of how these two men interacted. Joining a Breaking Bad Televisual Universe that is also a moral universe, one that weighs the soul of each protagonist in turn, El Camino makes space in the trilogy for hope. Gilligan picks up right away chronologically. Yet the movie, which contains as many nail-biting moments as the show used to spread over a full season, gives him something new to be: an action hero—albeit a uniquely conflicted, exhausted and in many ways broken one. Faces are rounder, and one famously bald head has an unfamiliar prosthetic quality. Where Leone could fill the space of his wide screen with sweaty men, close-ups of their straining eyes, and elongate tension by seeming to slow down every tete-a-tete, El Camino has the air of just killing time. His quest for money, resources, and a way out of Albuquerque finds him at the mercy of old friends, old enemies, and his own frailties. The images of Jesse putting the pistol up in the shower window, and later stuffing it in his waistband while it drips water, are hugely effective in explaining how terrified he is. The gripping El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie, out now on Netflix and showing through Sunday, Oct. El Camino picks up that same millisecond, after a cameo-ghost prologue. He did it for Walt, and he did it for Saul, and now Jesse wants Ed to do the same for him. Desperation makes Jesse twitchily calculating, but fear nips at his heels, too. He's on the run from a police manhunt, with his only hope of escape being Saul Goodman's hoover guy, Ed Galbraith. You can see how Jesse felt, perhaps against his better judgment, a bond with this person. Show creator Vince Gilligan, who wrote and directed El Camino , made Breaking Bad stand out thanks to its often striking, sweeping vistas, its distinctive for television, at least cinematography. How 'bout you, teenage retiree? Jesse, last seen on the show escaping from his squalid prison cell overseen by neo-Nazis forcing him to cook meth, is in desperate need of avoiding the cops and getting the hell out of Dodge or, rather, Albuquerque. With a short preface that sets up the hero's quest, the young man tries desperately to get out of Albuquerque, escaping from law enforcement as well as his own past misdeeds. But the film is merciless with Jesse, and to its benefit: His character emerges most clearly, through the shrouds of anger and grief, when he is placed in situations where the easy way out would be a killing. Jesse was probably never going to kill anybody. El Camino is about the consequences he didn't have to see. What are some cues that help clarify the filmmakers' intentions? Recommended, especially for fans of the original. We followed the arc of Walter White and Jesse Pinkman from that first day in the desert in the series premiere to the blood-soaked finale, and it was easy to trace the line of consequences that got us from the starting to the finish line. The tonal balance needed to present its main protagonist as both a desperate man and a monster, with a dexterity in writing that can deliver a and an with equal ease, and the delicate spatial choreography needed to pull off some signature pyrotechnics; they all made the series an enduring achievement. Were you rooting for him in spite of his earlier behavior? Surviving much longer, however, would be a test of his intelligence, resourcefulness and—most of all—his determination to live a better life. The shortest, most spoiler-free description of what happens in El Camino is this: the film documents how he tries to avoid the cops and eventually gain genuine freedom. They also provide an opportunity for appearances by the celebrated series principals. In El Camino, Gilligan directs energetically, with a bigger-looking budget that fleet of police cars! The Todd sequences are hallucinatory, and Paul finds new notes of terror-comedy in his reactions. That storytelling decision was secretly baffling, retroactively accelerating seismic, character-shifting rehab visits and marital separations into, like, weeklong events. Only you can decide what's best for you, Jesse. The global trending on social media immediately after the movie dropped early this morning made that abundantly apparent. Particularly if you're not a Better Call Saul viewer, it's lovely just to see Gilligan direct in this world again — to see the way he shoots deserts and canyons and open skies. Jesse is clearly painted as someone with nothing to lose, but with a razor-thin chance at starting over. Jesse is racing against the clock, with help from his crew, avoiding capture to get enough money together to buy a 'new dust filter for his Hoover MaxExtract PressurePro model', a new life. If the deal had happened, the then DreamWorks Animation boss planned to cut the episodes up into 5 to 10-minute chapters and release them online daily to paying fans l— sounds like his upcoming short-form content Quibi streamer, right? It's satisfying to spend a little time with 's Walter White, 's Jane Margolis, and 's Mike Ehrmentraut, and doubly pleasing to see and return in substantial roles that impact both the plot and Jesse Pinkham's evolution as a man who is deserving of our admiration. Was it integral to the story or intended mostly to provide thrills? Ed is none too pleased to see Jesse and offers little in the way of help or sympathy. His first stop is the home of his old friend Skinny Pete Charles Baker —a small-time criminal who is, predictably, in the midst of a video-game marathon with their pal Badger Matt L. That this film can stand on its own, all while paying tribute to the show that helped birth it, is maybe the most impressive escape act of them all. He does steal from his parents — but only guns. At one point, in the middle of a body-disposal setpiece, Gilligan montages marvelous landscape images, cinematically drunk on the arid expanse, daring you to guess how many other poor saps are buried out there. He was probably never going to get a woman he cared about killed, let alone two of them. Driven by inner rage and by the requirements of a story stretching its limits, Jesse feels at times more avatar than person. I love a lot of Breaking Bad, and I still think the show whiffed when it mostly banished Jesse in the last few episodes. I'm not sure those who watched Breaking Bad needed more reasons to understand why Jesse Pinkman eventually killed Todd Alquist, but if you did, El Camino gives one to you. Jesse has fled the scene, screaming and speeding into the night.。 。 。 。 。

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